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"My work is ever-changing, and I always strive to create something extraordinary. There is joy and satisfaction in seeing a new form evolving, and I have learned to use the  natural grain and figure of the wood to produce striking new designs. To take a raw Material, change its shape, and create beauty of form brings purpose to my life.

I find a special joy in turning spinning tops, perhaps because my philosophy is that play is good and life is about having a bit of fun."

Riveted?....I hope you find these tiny brass disks RIVETING. At this very moment, you may be RIVETED if you are wearing a pair of designer jeans or even a pair of everyday work pants. Although they don’t look like buttons, the National Button Society classifies them as buttons because they act as a closure and go thru a button hole. In button-speak, they are called RIVETED SHANK BUTTONS (RSBs) and they are still rivets.

 

                                               They were used with a buttonhole in the early

20th century, but small metal rivets for clothing were invented in 1872 by a Nevada tailor, Jacob Davis. He didn’t have the money to finance a patent, so he aligned with Levi Strauss to secure the patent. The rivet was first used to fasten miners pockets to their work pants and also to bind the seams together. In time, the seam rivets were adapted to be used with a button hole and became the Riveted Shank Button that is still in use today. The pictured buttons were made before 1940 and are considered “old” among rivet collectors. I will follow up in the future with “New” riveted shank buttons. They were used with a buttonhole in the early 20th century, but small metal rivets for clothing were invented in 1872 by a Nevada tailor, Jacob Davis. He didn’t have the money to finance a patent, so he aligned with Levi Strauss to secure the patent. The rivet was first used to fasten miners pockets to their work pants and also to bind the seams together. In time, the seam rivets were adapted to be used with a button hole and became the Riveted Shank Button that is still in use today. The pictured buttons were made before 1940 and are considered “old” among rivet collectors. I will follow up in the future with “New” riveted shank buttons.

Closeups:

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Posted by Lorrayne Bailey, Santa Clara Valley California Button Club.

May 12, 2020

lorrayne.bailey@gmail.com